What Is a CV?

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Many job hunters have bewildered over the question, “what is a CV?” and what is its difference from a resume. Otherwise known as curriculum vitae, a CV is a summary of one’s skills, academic background, and work experience. It is much more detailed than the resume, which is shorter, and less detailed.

Perhaps what is a CV’s most apparent difference from the resume is the personal information found on it, not usually seen in typical American resumes, such as civil status, date of birth, place of birth, nationality, and other such details? Curriculum vitaes are typically used in the United States to apply for job posts in academic, science, and research fields. They are also used for fellowship, scholarships, and grants.

In other countries, however, CV’s are more common to use than resumes. It has a detailed rundown of one’s educational attainment, any awards received, work experience (but only those that are relevant to the position being applied for), along with some description and special tasks accomplished during each job held before. Any scholarships, grants, published works, and licenses are also included in the curriculum vitae. For this reason, a CV is much longer and takes up more than one page than a resume.what is a cv

For a clearer picture of what is a CV, here are its basic contents:

Personal information. This includes name, address, phone number, email address, and whatever professional contact or social media presence one uses. Some places do not require the date of birth, as there might be age discrimination. Still, some would still require one.

Work history. The career information should be arranged in such a way that the most recent is stated first. Where appropriate, volunteer work, or part-time jobs may be included. Skills developed for each job should be highlighted and described.

Achievements and qualifications. Trainings, licenses, and awards should be enumerated too. These should be stated in the clear titles that they were given. The dates for trainings and when the awards and licenses were rewarded should be included as well.

Any extra information. Though not required, one may also include reasons for career changes, sudden gaps, such as medical reasons.

References. Citing a previous professor or employer who can attest to one’s integrity and quality of work is suggested.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Although detailed, the CV should be straightforward and to the point. It should not be overly decorative and the font used should be basic with no frilly loops and ends. Language and spelling are of prime importance. Spelling should be double checked and triple checked. Misspelling is a certain way to get rejected. Language should be formal and direct to show integrity and consistency.

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